What is DNS…

What is DNS?

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the phonebook of the Internet. Humans access information online through domain names, like nytimes.com or espn.com. Web browsers interact through Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. DNS translates domain names to IP addresses so browsers can load Internet resources.

Each device connected to the Internet has a unique IP address which other machines use to find the device. DNS servers eliminate the need for humans to memorize IP addresses such as 192.168.1.1 (in IPv4), or more complex newer alphanumeric IP addresses such as 2400:cb00:2048:1::c629:d7a2 (in IPv6).

How does DNS work?

The process of DNS resolution involves converting a hostname (such as www.example.com) into a computer-friendly IP address (such as 192.168.1.1). An IP address is given to each device on the Internet, and that address is necessary to find the appropriate Internet device – like a street address is used to find a particular home. When a user wants to load a webpage, a translation must occur between what a user types into their web browser (example.com) and the machine-friendly address necessary to locate the example.com webpage.

There are many DNS providers, at all levels of the internet. From ISP, State, Country, Continent & World! They do not have the same list.

This is how a Country can censor the internet and ban websites by redacting/delete them from the DNS.

By choosing a World DNS provider you get the full unedited internet.

CloudFlare
Primary 1.1.1.1 Secondary 1.0.0.1

Google
Primary 8.8.8.8 Secondary 8.8.4.4

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